Queen of the Helicopter Fleet

MH-65 Dolphin helicopter 6598 at Air Station Savannah, Georgia, was constructed in 1980 and is considered the Coast Guard's Queen of the Helicopter fleet as designated by the gold tail number. Air Station Savannah's area of responsibility extends from the norther border of South Carolina to Melbourne, Florida, or approximately 450 miles. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Barry Bena)
MH-65 Dolphin helicopter 6598 at Air Station Savannah, Georgia, was constructed in 1980 and is considered the Coast Guard's Queen of the Helicopter fleet as designated by the gold tail number. Air Station Savannah's area of responsibility extends from the norther border of South Carolina to Melbourne, Florida, or approximately 450 miles. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Barry Bena)

MH-65 Dolphin helicopter 6598 at Air Station Savannah, Georgia, was constructed in 1980 and is considered the Coast Guard’s Queen of the Helicopter fleet as designated by the gold tail number. Air Station Savannah’s area of responsibility extends from the norther border of South Carolina to Melbourne, Florida, or approximately 450 miles. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Barry Bena)

U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Nick Emigholz, an aviation maintenance technician,inspects the propellers on an Air Station Savannah, Georgia, MH-65D helicopter at Hunter Army Airfield after a training flight Mar. 15, 2020. Air Station Savannah's area of responsibility extends from the norther border of South Carolina to Melbourne, Florida, or approximately 450 miles. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Barry Bena)
U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Nick Emigholz, an aviation maintenance technician,inspects the propellers on an Air Station Savannah, Georgia, MH-65D helicopter at Hunter Army Airfield after a training flight Mar. 15, 2020. Air Station Savannah’s area of responsibility extends from the norther border of South Carolina to Melbourne, Florida, or approximately 450 miles. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Barry Bena)

U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Nick Emigholz, an aviation maintenance technician, refuels an Air Station Savannah, Georgia, MH-65D helicopter at Hunter Army Airfield after a training flight Mar. 15, 2020. Air Station Savannah’s area of responsibility extends from the norther border of South Carolina to Melbourne, Florida, or approximately 450 miles. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Barry Bena)

U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael Baierski, an aviation survival technician, stands by with a fire extinguisher during a refueling evolution on an Air Station Savannah, Georgia, MH-65D helicopter at Hunter Army Airfield, Mar. 15, 2020. Air Station Savannah’s area of responsibility extends from the norther border of South Carolina to Melbourne, Florida, or approximately 450 miles. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Barry Bena)

U.S. Coast Guardsmen from Air Station Savannah, Georgia, swap crews at Hunter Army Airfield for search-and-rescue standby duty at Air Facility Charleston, S.C., Mar. 15, 2020. Air Station Savannah personnel conduct 24-hour duty rotations in Charleston to cut down transit times during SAR responses in the South Carolina area of responsibility. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Barry Bena)

MH-65 Dolphin helicopter 6598 at Air Station Savannah, Georgia, was constructed in 1980 and is considered the Coast Guard’s Queen of the Helicopter fleet as designated by the gold tail number. Air Station Savannah’s area of responsibility extends from the norther border of South Carolina to Melbourne, Florida, or approximately 450 miles. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Barry Bena)

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