Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division teaches thousands how to effectively engage targets

U.S. Marines engage targets from the prone position during their annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
U.S. Marines engage targets from the prone position during their annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

U.S. Marines engage targets from the prone position during their annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

U.S. Marines learn how to teach Marines moving target engagement techniques as part of the Combat Marksmanship Coach Course at Range at 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The Combat Marksmanship Coach course develops Marines to be proficient marksmanship coaches in order to enhance combat effectiveness of the Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
U.S. Marines learn how to teach Marines moving target engagement techniques as part of the Combat Marksmanship Coach Course at Range at 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The Combat Marksmanship Coach course develops Marines to be proficient marksmanship coaches in order to enhance combat effectiveness of the Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Trent Weber, a rifleman with Alpha Company, 1st Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, 1st Marine Division, fires an M27 infantry automatic rifle during his annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Weber is a native of Chicago. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Trent Weber, a rifleman with Alpha Company, 1st Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, 1st Marine Division, fires an M27 infantry automatic rifle during his annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Weber is a native of Chicago. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

U.S. Marine Sgt. Kennedy Ralph, a joint terminal attack controller with Alpha Company, 1st Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, 1st Marine Division, fires his M4 carbine during his annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Ralph is a native of Spokane, Washington. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
U.S. Marine Sgt. Kennedy Ralph, a joint terminal attack controller with Alpha Company, 1st Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, 1st Marine Division, fires his M4 carbine during his annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Ralph is a native of Spokane, Washington. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

U.S. Marines standby during their annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
U.S. Marines standby during their annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

U.S. Marines engage targets from the prone position during their annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
U.S. Marines engage targets from the prone position during their annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

A U.S. Marine conducts his annual rifle qualification at Range 116A, on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
A U.S. Marine conducts his annual rifle qualification at Range 116A, on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Bailey Amey, a bulk fuel specialist with Bulk Fuel Company, 7th Engineer Support Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group, fires his M16A4 service rifle during his annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Amey is a native of Brisbane, Australia. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Bailey Amey, a bulk fuel specialist with Bulk Fuel Company, 7th Engineer Support Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group, fires his M16A4 service rifle during his annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Amey is a native of Brisbane, Australia. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

U.S. Marine Cpl. Cody Cole, a combat marksmanship coach with Marksmanship Training Division, Headquarters and Support Battalion, Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, instructs Marines during the annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Cole is a native of Fayetteville, Tennessee. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
U.S. Marine Cpl. Cody Cole, a combat marksmanship coach with Marksmanship Training Division, Headquarters and Support Battalion, Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, instructs Marines during the annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Cole is a native of Fayetteville, Tennessee. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

U.S. Marine Cpl. Cody Cole, a combat marksmanship coach with Marksmanship Training Division, Headquarters and Support Battalion, Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, monitors a stopwatch during an annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Cole is a native of Fayetteville, Tennessee. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
U.S. Marine Cpl. Cody Cole, a combat marksmanship coach with Marksmanship Training Division, Headquarters and Support Battalion, Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, monitors a stopwatch during an annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Cole is a native of Fayetteville, Tennessee. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

U.S. Marine Cpl. Dakotah Boatwright, a combat marksmanship coach with Marksmanship Training Division, Headquarters and Support Battalion, Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, watches over a fellow Marine during an annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Boatwright is a native of Cleveland, Texas. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
U.S. Marine Cpl. Dakotah Boatwright, a combat marksmanship coach with Marksmanship Training Division, Headquarters and Support Battalion, Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, watches over a fellow Marine during an annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Boatwright is a native of Cleveland, Texas. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

U.S. Marines assume the prone position during their annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
U.S. Marines assume the prone position during their annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Logan Schultz, an automotive organizational mechanic with 1st Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company, I Marine Expeditionary Force Information Group, loads ammunition before conducting his annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Schultz is a native of Drayton, Ohio. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Logan Schultz, an automotive organizational mechanic with 1st Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company, I Marine Expeditionary Force Information Group, loads ammunition before conducting his annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Schultz is a native of Drayton, Ohio. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

U.S. Marine Sgt. Hope Ramsey, a career planner with 1st Radio Battalion, I Marine Expeditionary Force Information Group, breaks down her M16A4 service rifle for inspection before conducting her annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Ramsey is a native of Milton, Wisconsin. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
U.S. Marine Sgt. Hope Ramsey, a career planner with 1st Radio Battalion, I Marine Expeditionary Force Information Group, breaks down her M16A4 service rifle for inspection before conducting her annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Ramsey is a native of Milton, Wisconsin. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

U.S. Marine Cpl. Sydney Smith, a combat videographer with 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit, breaks down her M16A4 service rifle for inspection before conducting her annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Smith is a native of Exeter, Rhode Island. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
U.S. Marine Cpl. Sydney Smith, a combat videographer with 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit, breaks down her M16A4 service rifle for inspection before conducting her annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Smith is a native of Exeter, Rhode Island. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

A U.S. Marine conducts his annual rifle qualification at Range 116A, on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
A U.S. Marine conducts his annual rifle qualification at Range 116A, on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

U.S. Marines receive ammo before conducting their annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
U.S. Marines receive ammo before conducting their annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

U.S. Marines receive ammo before conducting their annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
U.S. Marines receive ammo before conducting their annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

U.S. Marine Cpl. Magdalena Banda, a transmission system operator with Marine Air Control Group 38, 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, poses for a photo before conducting her annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Banda is a native of Houston. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
U.S. Marine Cpl. Magdalena Banda, a transmission system operator with Marine Air Control Group 38, 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, poses for a photo before conducting her annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Banda is a native of Houston. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

U.S. Marines receive ammo before conducting their annual rifle qualification at Range 116A, on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
U.S. Marines receive ammo before conducting their annual rifle qualification at Range 116A, on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

U.S. Marine 1st Lt. Raajpaal Gohlwar, a communications officer with 9th Communication Battalion, I Marine Expeditionary Force Information Group, fills out his range card before conducting his annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Gohlwar is a native of Phoenix. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
U.S. Marine 1st Lt. Raajpaal Gohlwar, a communications officer with 9th Communication Battalion, I Marine Expeditionary Force Information Group, fills out his range card before conducting his annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. Gohlwar is a native of Phoenix. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

A U.S. Marine sights in M4 carbine before conducting his annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)
A U.S. Marine sights in M4 carbine before conducting his annual rifle qualification at Range 116A on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, May 11, 2022. Camp Pendleton’s Marksmanship Training Division trains 22,000 Marines and sailors each year across the installation to effectively engage targets with both rifles and pistols. The ARQ is a timed course of fire, ranging from 500 yards down to 15 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin Whitehurst)

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