An A-10 Warthog in flight, seen from the window of a KC-135 Stratotanker. U.S. Army Lt. Col. Jay Skinner, Spc. Mitchell and Spc. Carlisle ride in an incentive flight courtesy of the 117th Air Refueling Wing, Sumpter Smith Joint National Guard Base, Ala., Jan. 9, 2021. The mission of this flight was to refuel three A-10 Warthogs. Carlisle and Mitchell were selected as a reward for their efforts in support of Task Force 31. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by: Tech. Sgt. Jim Bentley)
Air National Guard

Task Force 31 Soldiers on Incentive Flight

An A-10 Warthog in flight, seen from the window of a KC-135 Stratotanker. U.S. Army Lt. Col. Jay Skinner, Spc. Mitchell and Spc. Carlisle ride in an incentive flight courtesy of the 117th Air Refueling Wing, Sumpter Smith Joint National Guard Base, Ala., Jan. 9, 2021. The mission of this flight was to refuel three A-10 Warthogs. Carlisle and Mitchell [Read More …]

The B-52H bomber nick named “Wise Guy,” sits in post dock nearing completion of its regeneration back to active service, Nov. 19, 2020. The bomber sat in the desert for 10 years at the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group’s National-Level Airpower Reservoir located at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona and is the second B-52H aircraft to be brought back to active service. The first aircraft was nick named “Ghost Rider” and was regenerated in 2015. Both bombers are here at the same time and will return to the 5th Bomb Wing at Minot AFB, North Dakota. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ron Mullan)
U.S. Air Force

Two B-52H bombers regenerated to active service undergoing simultaneous maintenance at Tinker’s Air Logistics Complex

The B-52H bomber nick named “Wise Guy,” sits in post dock nearing completion of its regeneration back to active service, Nov. 19, 2020. The bomber sat in the desert for 10 years at the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group’s National-Level Airpower Reservoir located at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona and is the second B-52H aircraft to be brought back [Read More …]

A U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III with the Pacific Air Forces 535th Airlift Squadron conducts a training flight at Marine Corps Air Station Kaneohe Bay, Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Jan. 6, 2021. The squadron, based aboard Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, operated from MCAS Kaneohe to meet the unit’s annual flight hour requirements. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Luke Kuennen)
U.S. Marine Corps

Mighty Mice: Globemasters fly over MCAS Kaneohe Bay

A U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III with the Pacific Air Forces 535th Airlift Squadron conducts a training flight at Marine Corps Air Station Kaneohe Bay, Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Jan. 6, 2021. The squadron, based aboard Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, operated from MCAS Kaneohe to meet the unit’s annual flight hour requirements. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Luke [Read More …]

A CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), is used to refuel an AH-1Z Viper attack helicopter during a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) training exercise at Landing Zone Dodo, Okinawa, Japan, Jan. 5, 2021. A FARP operation allows aircraft to be refueled and re-armed at a distance closer to the area of operations than the main operating base, which decreases the turnaround time during sustained operations. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brienna Tuck)
U.S. Marine Corps

31st MEU Marines establish a FARP

A CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), is used to refuel an AH-1Z Viper attack helicopter during a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) training exercise at Landing Zone Dodo, Okinawa, Japan, Jan. 5, 2021. A FARP operation allows aircraft to be refueled and re-armed at a distance closer to [Read More …]

Staff Sgt. Matthew Grammar receives the COVID-19 vaccine from Sgt. Michael Windham, Mississippi Medical Detachment, at Joint Force Headquarters in Jackson, Miss., Jan. 7, 2021. The COVID-19 vaccine is voluntary for Mississippi National Guard Service Members, but is strongly encouraged to maintain readiness. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Scott Tynes)
U.S. Army

Mississippi Guardsmen Receive COVID Vaccine

Staff Sgt. Matthew Grammar receives the COVID-19 vaccine from Sgt. Michael Windham, Mississippi Medical Detachment, at Joint Force Headquarters in Jackson, Miss., Jan. 7, 2021. The COVID-19 vaccine is voluntary for Mississippi National Guard Service Members, but is strongly encouraged to maintain readiness. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Scott Tynes)

210107-N-DQ752-1059 NORTH ARABIAN SEA (Jan. 7, 2021) An F/A-18C Hornet, from the “Death Rattlers” of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 323, launches off the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). Nimitz, the flagship of Nimitz Carrier Strike Group, is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations to ensure maritime stability and security in the Central Region, connecting the Mediterranean and Pacific through the Western Indian Ocean and three critical chokepoints to the free flow of global commerce. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cheyenne Geletka/Released)
U.S. Navy

Nimitz Patrols the North Arabian Sea

210107-N-DQ752-1059 NORTH ARABIAN SEA (Jan. 7, 2021) An F/A-18C Hornet, from the “Death Rattlers” of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 323, launches off the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). Nimitz, the flagship of Nimitz Carrier Strike Group, is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations to ensure maritime stability and security in the [Read More …]

After arriving at the range complex, Staff Sgts. Hunter and Sebastian Siwek talk about the schedule of events to take place. The last week of training begins on a cold rain swept day trip to the Orchard Combat Training Center. The scout trainees will take turns driving a Bradley Fighting Vehicle. On the range the trainees will fire the Mark 19 machine grenade launcher, the 50 Cal. Machine gun and the 240B machine gun. During the remainder of the week, they learn how to boresight the 25mm gun; the fundamentals of reconnaissance and security; how to establish an observation post; and how to handle and detonate explosives. U.S. Army Cavalry Scouts act as the eyes and ears on the field, gathering information about enemy positions, vehicles, weapons, and activity. The scouts often operate in small groups gathering intelligence. With the information they gather, commanders can make informed decisions about how to move troops and where and when to attack. Their scouting duties include conducting mounted and dismounted navigation, collecting data about tunnels and bridges, and serving as members of observation and listening posts. In addition to basic soldiering skills, cavalry scouts learn to secure and prepare ammunition on scout vehicles, load, clear and fire individual and crew-served weapons.
U.S. Army

Scout Training – Week 3, Part 1

After arriving at the range complex, Staff Sgts. Hunter and Sebastian Siwek talk about the schedule of events to take place. The last week of training begins on a cold rain swept day trip to the Orchard Combat Training Center. The scout trainees will take turns driving a Bradley Fighting Vehicle. On the range the trainees will fire the Mark [Read More …]