Of Sand and Ice : One Woman’s Adventure To Distant Parts of The Globe

Kristen Hosek, Kwajalein Jr.-Sr. High School science teacher, posed with the auroras after a half-mile hike to the top of Scott Base Hill in August 2015 during her second season on the ice. “We heard there was good aurora activity,” she said. “To get that long-exposure shot and capture the light of the auroras, I had to stand completely still in about -25 F (with -50 F windchill) for 15 seconds which is a lot harder than it sounds. August is generally the coldest and stormiest month of the year with the sun peaking above the horizon for an hour or two. “The auroras first appeared as luminescent clouds, until they started to ripple and wave like glowing ribbons,” she added. “The long exposure shots bring out the brilliant colors.” (Photo by Ben Adkison)
Kristen Hosek, Kwajalein Jr.-Sr. High School science teacher, posed with the auroras after a half-mile hike to the top of Scott Base Hill in August 2015 during her second season on the ice. “We heard there was good aurora activity,” she said. “To get that long-exposure shot and capture the light of the auroras, I had to stand completely still in about -25 F (with -50 F windchill) for 15 seconds which is a lot harder than it sounds. August is generally the coldest and stormiest month of the year with the sun peaking above the horizon for an hour or two. “The auroras first appeared as luminescent clouds, until they started to ripple and wave like glowing ribbons,” she added. “The long exposure shots bring out the brilliant colors.” (Photo by Ben Adkison)

Kristen Hosek, Kwajalein Jr.-Sr. High School science teacher, posed with the auroras after a half-mile hike to the top of Scott Base Hill in August 2015 during her second season on the ice. “We heard there was good aurora activity,” she said. “To get that long-exposure shot and capture the light of the auroras, I had to stand completely still in about -25 F (with -50 F windchill) for 15 seconds which is a lot harder than it sounds. August is generally the coldest and stormiest month of the year with the sun peaking above the horizon for an hour or two. “The auroras first appeared as luminescent clouds, until they started to ripple and wave like glowing ribbons,” she added. “The long exposure shots bring out the brilliant colors.” (Photo by Ben Adkison)

Science teacher Kristen Hosek brings a kinesthetic astronomy lesson to her students recently. “The students “became” Earth to rotate and revolve (with a tilt!) to experience the seasons, solstices, equinoxes, and the zodiac plane.” (Photo courtesy of the Kwajalein JR.-Sr. High School Yearbook Staff)
Science teacher Kristen Hosek brings a kinesthetic astronomy lesson to her students recently. “The students “became” Earth to rotate and revolve (with a tilt!) to experience the seasons, solstices, equinoxes, and the zodiac plane.” (Photo courtesy of the Kwajalein JR.-Sr. High School Yearbook Staff)

Fishing in 10-degree weather? Sure, if you’re Kristen Hosek in November 2016 during her third trip to Antarctica. “It’s amazing how much the sun can warm you (and sunburn you) at such low temps,” she said. “We were trying to catch Trematomus bernacchii, the emerald rock cod. We caught between five and 30 fish on any given day.” (Photo by Anthony Tercero)

Kristen Hosek, Kwajalein Jr.-Sr. High School science teacher, posed with the auroras after a half-mile hike to the top of Scott Base Hill in August 2015 during her second season on the ice. “We heard there was good aurora activity,” she said. “To get that long-exposure shot and capture the light of the auroras, I had to stand completely still in about -25 F (with -50 F windchill) for 15 seconds which is a lot harder than it sounds. August is generally the coldest and stormiest month of the year with the sun peaking above the horizon for an hour or two. “The auroras first appeared as luminescent clouds, until they started to ripple and wave like glowing ribbons,” she added. “The long exposure shots bring out the brilliant colors.” (Photo by Ben Adkison)

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*