NMCB-3 and UCT-2 Execute First Ever Pile Driving Exercise

200224-N-MW964-1101 PORT HUENEME, Calif. (Feb. 24, 2020) Seabees assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 3, guides cables attatched to a vibratory driver/extractor (VDE) system that is connected to a 50-ton lattice boom crawler crane. onto the existing concrete pier for inspection during the first ever pile driving exercise. The training will increase capabilities for future crane, pile driving and pier damage repair missions. Seabees are the expeditionary engineering and construction experts of the naval service. They provide task-tailored, adaptable and combat-ready engineering and construction forces that deploy to support Navy objectives globally. (U.S. Navy photo by Engineering Aide 1st Class Heather Salzman/Released)
200224-N-MW964-1101 PORT HUENEME, Calif. (Feb. 24, 2020) Seabees assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 3, guides cables attatched to a vibratory driver/extractor (VDE) system that is connected to a 50-ton lattice boom crawler crane. onto the existing concrete pier for inspection during the first ever pile driving exercise. The training will increase capabilities for future crane, pile driving and pier damage repair missions. Seabees are the expeditionary engineering and construction experts of the naval service. They provide task-tailored, adaptable and combat-ready engineering and construction forces that deploy to support Navy objectives globally. (U.S. Navy photo by Engineering Aide 1st Class Heather Salzman/Released)

200224-N-MW964-1101 PORT HUENEME, Calif. (Feb. 24, 2020) Seabees assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 3, guides cables attatched to a vibratory driver/extractor (VDE) system that is connected to a 50-ton lattice boom crawler crane. onto the existing concrete pier for inspection during the first ever pile driving exercise. The training will increase capabilities for future crane, pile driving and pier damage repair missions. Seabees are the expeditionary engineering and construction experts of the naval service. They provide task-tailored, adaptable and combat-ready engineering and construction forces that deploy to support Navy objectives globally. (U.S. Navy photo by Engineering Aide 1st Class Heather Salzman/Released)

200224-N-MW964-1102 PORT HUENEME, Calif. (Feb. 24, 2020) Seabees Equipment Operator 2nd Class Alex Jackson assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 3, gobserves as a timber pile that will be driven into the oceans floor 30’ as one of four piles that will make up a temporary pier.  The training will increase capabilities for future crane, pile driving and pier damage repair missions. Seabees are the expeditionary engineering and construction experts of the naval service. They provide task-tailored, adaptable and combat-ready engineering and construction forces that deploy to support Navy objectives globally. (U.S. Navy photo by Engineering Aide 1st Class Heather Salzman/Released)
200224-N-MW964-1102 PORT HUENEME, Calif. (Feb. 24, 2020) Seabees Equipment Operator 2nd Class Alex Jackson assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 3, gobserves as a timber pile that will be driven into the oceans floor 30’ as one of four piles that will make up a temporary pier. The training will increase capabilities for future crane, pile driving and pier damage repair missions. Seabees are the expeditionary engineering and construction experts of the naval service. They provide task-tailored, adaptable and combat-ready engineering and construction forces that deploy to support Navy objectives globally. (U.S. Navy photo by Engineering Aide 1st Class Heather Salzman/Released)

200224-N-MW964-1101 PORT HUENEME, Calif. (Feb. 24, 2020) Seabees assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 3, guides cables attatched to a vibratory driver/extractor (VDE) system that is connected to a 50-ton lattice boom crawler crane. onto the existing concrete pier for inspection during the first ever pile driving exercise. The training will increase capabilities for future crane, pile driving and pier damage repair missions. Seabees are the expeditionary engineering and construction experts of the naval service. They provide task-tailored, adaptable and combat-ready engineering and construction forces that deploy to support Navy objectives globally. (U.S. Navy photo by Engineering Aide 1st Class Heather Salzman/Released)

200224-N-MW964-1003 PORT HUENEME, Calif. (Feb. 24, 2020) Seabees Equipment Operator 2nd Class Alex Jackson assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 3, guides a Seabee Crane Operator in positioning of a timber pile that will be driven into the oceans floor 30’ as one of four piles that will make up a temporary pier. The training will increase capabilities for future crane, pile driving and pier damage repair missions. Seabees are the expeditionary engineering and construction experts of the naval service. They provide task-tailored, adaptable and combat-ready engineering and construction forces that deploy to support Navy objectives globally. (U.S. Navy photo by Engineering Aide 1st Class Heather Salzman/Released)

200220-N-MW964-1066 PORT HUENEME, Calif. (Feb. 20, 2020) Seabees assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 3, drive a corrugated sheet pile into place attached with a 50-ton lattice boom crawler crane with a vibratory driver/extractor (VDE) system during pile driving training exercise on board Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme. The training will increase capabilities for future crane, pile driving and pier damage repair missions. Seabees are the expeditionary engineering and construction experts of the naval service. They provide task-tailored, adaptable and combat-ready engineering and construction forces that deploy to support Navy objectives globally. (U.S. Navy photo by Engineering Aide 1st Class Heather Salzman/Released)

200220-N-MW964-1060 PORT HUENEME, Calif. (Feb. 20, 2020) Seabees assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 3 guide a vibratory driver/extractor (VDE) system attached to a 50-ton lattice boom crawler crane down in order to check cabling during pile driving training exercise on board Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme. The training will increase capabilities for future crane, pile driving and pier damage repair missions. Seabees are the expeditionary engineering and construction experts of the naval service. They provide task-tailored, adaptable and combat-ready engineering and construction forces that deploy to support Navy objectives globally. (U.S. Navy photo by Engineering Aide 1st Class Heather Salzman/Released)

200220-N-MW964-1056 PORT HUENEME, Calif. (Feb. 20, 2020) Seabees assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 3 maneuver a corrugated sheet pile into place attached with a 50-ton lattice boom crawler crane with a vibratory driver/extractor (VDE) system into position during pile driving training exercise on board Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme. The training will increase capabilities for future crane, pile driving and pier damage repair missions. Seabees are the expeditionary engineering and construction experts of the naval service. They provide task-tailored, adaptable and combat-ready engineering and construction forces that deploy to support Navy objectives globally. (U.S. Navy photo by Engineering Aide 1st Class Heather Salzman/Released)

200220-N-MW964-1025 PORT HUENEME, Calif. (Feb. 20, 2020) Seabee Equipment Operator 2nd Class Alex Jackson, left, assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 3 guides Seabee Crane Opertator Equipment Operator Mackenzie Bickel in place while Constructionman Colting Cogley, center, and Equipment Operator Atwood, attach a vibratory driver/extractor (VDE) system during pile driving training exercise on board Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme. The training will increase capabilities for future crane, pile driving and pier damage repair missions. Seabees are the expeditionary engineering and construction experts of the naval service. They provide task-tailored, adaptable and combat-ready engineering and construction forces that deploy to support Navy objectives globally. (U.S. Navy photo by Engineering Aide 1st Class Heather Salzman/Released)

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