Marines train for rapid combined arms assault

U.S. Marines with Combined Anti-Armor Team, Ground Combat Element, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, participate in a simulated fire mission utilizing heavy machine guns and artillery support from M777 Howitzers at Mount Bundey Training Area, NT, Australia, Aug. 7, 2020. The training provided Marines a unique opportunity to develop new techniques and procedures to integrate direct and indirect fire. The ability to rapidly deploy fire support and employ indirect fire weapons provide the Marine Corps an advantage as an expeditionary forward force deployed to austere environments. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Lydia Gordon)
U.S. Marines with Combined Anti-Armor Team, Ground Combat Element, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, participate in a simulated fire mission utilizing heavy machine guns and artillery support from M777 Howitzers at Mount Bundey Training Area, NT, Australia, Aug. 7, 2020. The training provided Marines a unique opportunity to develop new techniques and procedures to integrate direct and indirect fire. The ability to rapidly deploy fire support and employ indirect fire weapons provide the Marine Corps an advantage as an expeditionary forward force deployed to austere environments. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Lydia Gordon)

U.S. Marines with Combined Anti-Armor Team, Ground Combat Element, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, participate in a simulated fire mission utilizing heavy machine guns and artillery support from M777 Howitzers at Mount Bundey Training Area, NT, Australia, Aug. 7, 2020. The training provided Marines a unique opportunity to develop new techniques and procedures to integrate direct and indirect fire. The ability to rapidly deploy fire support and employ indirect fire weapons provide the Marine Corps an advantage as an expeditionary forward force deployed to austere environments. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Lydia Gordon)

U.S. Marines with the Combined Anti-Armor Team, Ground Combat Element, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, provide suppression during a conduct a combined arms assault at Mount Bundey Training Area, NT, Australia, Aug. 7, 2020. While Marines conducted the notional mounted assault, indirect fire support was provided by the 81mm mortar section and three M777 Howitzers. The training provided Marines a unique opportunity to develop new techniques and procedures to integrate direct and indirect fire. The ability to rapidly deploy fire support and employ indirect fire weapons provide the Marine Corps an advantage as an expeditionary forward force deployed to austere environments.  (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Lydia Gordon)
U.S. Marines with the Combined Anti-Armor Team, Ground Combat Element, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, provide suppression during a conduct a combined arms assault at Mount Bundey Training Area, NT, Australia, Aug. 7, 2020. While Marines conducted the notional mounted assault, indirect fire support was provided by the 81mm mortar section and three M777 Howitzers. The training provided Marines a unique opportunity to develop new techniques and procedures to integrate direct and indirect fire. The ability to rapidly deploy fire support and employ indirect fire weapons provide the Marine Corps an advantage as an expeditionary forward force deployed to austere environments. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Lydia Gordon)

U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Jacob Montana with Combined Anti-Armor Team, Ground Combat Element, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, relays commands to his Marines during a simulated fire mission utilizing heavy machine guns and artillery support from M777 Howitzers at Mount Bundey Training Area, NT, Australia, Aug. 7, 2020. The training provided Marines a unique opportunity to develop new techniques and procedures to integrate direct and indirect fire. The ability to rapidly deploy fire support and employ indirect fire weapons provide the Marine Corps an advantage as an expeditionary forward force deployed to austere environments. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Lydia Gordon)

U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Weston Davis and Lance Cpl. Tyler Hughes with Combined Anti-Armor Team, Ground Combat Element, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, participate in a simulated fire mission utilizing heavy machine guns and artillery support from M777 Howitzers at Mount Bundey Training Area, NT, Australia, Aug. 7, 2020. The training provided Marines a unique opportunity to develop new techniques and procedures to integrate direct and indirect fire. The ability to rapidly deploy fire support and employ indirect fire weapons provide the Marine Corps an advantage as an expeditionary forward force deployed to austere environments. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Lydia Gordon)

U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Tyler Hughes with Combined Anti-Armor Team, Ground Combat Element, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, fires a .50 caliber heavy machine gun during combined arms training at Mount Bundey Training Area, NT, Australia, Aug. 7, 2020. While CAAT Marines conducted a notional mounted assault, indirect fire support was provided by the 81mm mortar section and three M777 Howitzers. The training provided Marines a unique opportunity to develop new techniques and procedures to integrate direct and indirect fire. The ability to rapidly deploy fire support and employ indirect fire weapons provide the Marine Corps an advantage as an expeditionary forward force deployed to austere environments. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Lydia Gordon)

U.S. Marines with Combined Anti-Armor Team, Ground Combat Element, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, participate in a simulated fire mission utilizing heavy machine guns and artillery support from M777 Howitzers at Mount Bundey Training Area, NT, Australia, Aug. 7, 2020. The training provided Marines a unique opportunity to develop new techniques and procedures to integrate direct and indirect fire. The ability to rapidly deploy fire support and employ indirect fire weapons provide the Marine Corps an advantage as an expeditionary forward force deployed to austere environments. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Lydia Gordon)

U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Baker Otter with Combined Anti-Armor Team, Ground Combat Element, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, goes on a leader’s recon patrol in order to gain intelligence for a fire mission being conducted at Mount Bundey Training Area, NT, Australia, Aug. 7, 2020. While CAAT Marines conducted a notional mounted assault, indirect fire support was provided by the 81mm mortar section and three M777 Howitzers. The training provided Marines a unique opportunity to develop new techniques and procedures to integrate direct and indirect fire. The ability to rapidly deploy fire support and employ indirect fire weapons provide the Marine Corps an advantage as an expeditionary forward force deployed to austere environments. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Lydia Gordon)

U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Nathan Duffel with Combined Anti-Armor Team, Ground Combat Element, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, briefs his Marines on the course of action for a fire mission being conducted at Mount Bundey Training Area, NT, Australia, Aug. 7, 2020. While CAAT Marines conducted a notional mounted assault, indirect fire support was provided by the 81mm mortar section and three M777 Howitzers. The training provided Marines a unique opportunity to develop new techniques and procedures to integrate direct and indirect fire. The ability to rapidly deploy fire support and employ indirect fire weapons provide the Marine Corps an advantage as an expeditionary forward force deployed to austere environments. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Lydia Gordon)

U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Jeffery Ott with Ground Combat Element, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, coordinates communications with an artillery unit working with the Combined Anti-Armor Team at Mount Bundey Training Area, NT, Australia, Aug. 7, 2020. While CAAT Marines conducted a notional mounted assault, indirect fire support was provided by the 81mm mortar section and three M777 Howitzers. The training provided Marines a unique opportunity to develop new techniques and procedures to integrate direct and indirect fire. The ability to rapidly deploy fire support and employ indirect fire weapons provide the Marine Corps an advantage as an expeditionary forward force deployed to austere environments. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Lydia Gordon)

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