Marines, sailors endure water survival advanced training

U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Zachary Larsen, a combat graphic specialist with Headquarters and Support Battalion Marine Corps Installations Pacific-Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, attempts to escape a simulated attack during a water survival advanced (WSA) course Jan. 29, 2020, at Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. WSA is the highest swim qualification Marines and sailors can receive before attending the instructor's course. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennan J. Beauton)
U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Zachary Larsen, a combat graphic specialist with Headquarters and Support Battalion Marine Corps Installations Pacific-Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, attempts to escape a simulated attack during a water survival advanced (WSA) course Jan. 29, 2020, at Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. WSA is the highest swim qualification Marines and sailors can receive before attending the instructor's course. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennan J. Beauton)

U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Crickellas P. Jagger, a motor transportation operator with Combat Logistics Battalion 4, Combat Logistics Regiment 3, 3d Marine Logistics Group, treads water during water survival advanced (WSA) training at the Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, Jan. 31, 2020. The Marine Corps Water Survival Training Program employs water survival skills of increasing levels of ability designed to reduce fear, raise self-confidence, and develop Marines with the ability to survive in water. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Marvin E. Lopez Navarro)
U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Crickellas P. Jagger, a motor transportation operator with Combat Logistics Battalion 4, Combat Logistics Regiment 3, 3d Marine Logistics Group, treads water during water survival advanced (WSA) training at the Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, Jan. 31, 2020. The Marine Corps Water Survival Training Program employs water survival skills of increasing levels of ability designed to reduce fear, raise self-confidence, and develop Marines with the ability to survive in water. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Marvin E. Lopez Navarro)

A U.S. Marine preforms a 250-meter swim during water survival advanced (WSA) training at the Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, Jan. 31, 2020. The Marine Corps Water Survival Training Program employs water survival skills of increasing levels of ability designed to reduce fear, raise self-confidence, and develop Marines with the ability to survive in water. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Marvin E. Lopez Navarro)

A U.S. Marine treads water during water survival advanced (WSA) training at the Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, Jan. 31, 2020. The Marine Corps Water Survival Training Program employs water survival skills of increasing levels of ability designed to reduce fear, raise self-confidence, and develop Marines with the ability to survive in water. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Marvin E. Lopez Navarro)

A U.S. Marine treads water during water survival advanced (WSA) training at the Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, Jan. 31, 2020. The Marine Corps Water Survival Training Program employs water survival skills of increasing levels of ability designed to reduce fear, raise self-confidence, and develop Marines with the ability to survive in water. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Marvin E. Lopez Navarro)

A U.S. Marine preforms a gear retention swim during water survival advanced (WSA) training at the Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, Jan. 31, 2020. The Marine Corps Water Survival Training Program employs water survival skills of increasing levels of ability designed to reduce fear, raise self-confidence, and develop Marines with the ability to survive in water. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Marvin E. Lopez Navarro)

U.S. Marines preform a gear shed exercise during water survival advanced (WSA) training at the Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, Jan. 31, 2020. The Marine Corps Water Survival Training Program employs water survival skills of increasing levels of ability designed to reduce fear, raise self-confidence, and develop Marines with the ability to survive in water. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Marvin E. Lopez Navarro)

U.S. Marines preform a gear shed exercise during water survival advanced (WSA) training at the Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, Jan. 31, 2020. The Marine Corps Water Survival Training Program employs water survival skills of increasing levels of ability designed to reduce fear, raise self-confidence, and develop Marines with the ability to survive in water. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Marvin E. Lopez Navarro)

U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Brennan M. Priest, combat videographer with Headquarters and Support Battalion, Marine Corps Installations Pacific, helps a fellow during water survival advanced (WSA) training at the Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, Jan. 31, 2020. The Marine Corps Water Survival Training Program employs water survival skills of increasing levels of ability designed to reduce fear, raise self-confidence, and develop Marines with the ability to survive in water. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Marvin E. Lopez Navarro)

A U.S. Marine performs a 25-meter swim during water survival advanced (WSA) training at the Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, Jan. 31, 2020. The Marine Corps Water Survival Training Program employs water survival skills of increasing levels of ability designed to reduce fear, raise self-confidence, and develop Marines with the ability to survive in water. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Marvin E. Lopez Navarro)

U.S. Marines perform a 25-meter swim during water survival advanced (WSA) training at the Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, Jan. 31, 2020. The Marine Corps Water Survival Training Program employs water survival skills of increasing levels of ability designed to reduce fear, raise self-confidence, and develop Marines with the ability to survive in water. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Marvin E. Lopez Navarro)

U.S. Marine Corps instructors of water survival conduct simulated casualty exercises during a water survival advanced course Jan. 31, 2020, at Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. WSA is the highest swim qualification Marines and sailors can receive before attending the instructor’s course. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennan J. Beauton)

U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Brennan Priest, a combat videographer with Headquarters and Support Battalion Marine Corps Installations Pacific-Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, swims during a water survival advanced (WSA) course Jan. 30, 2020, at Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. WSA Marines and sailors are authorized to physically train up to five people in the pool. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennan J. Beauton)

U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Zachary Larsen, a combat graphic specialist with Headquarters and Support Battalion Marine Corps Installations Pacific-Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, attempts to escape a simulated attack during a water survival advanced (WSA) course Jan. 29, 2020, at Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. WSA is the highest swim qualification Marines and sailors can receive before attending the instructor’s course. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennan J. Beauton)

U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Caelan Long, a supply chain and material management specialist with Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, completes a timed swim Jan. 29, 2020, at Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. WSA is the highest swim qualification Marines and sailors can receive before attending the instructor’s course. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennan J. Beauton)

U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Zachary Larsen, the course class commander and a combat graphic specialist with Headquarters and Support Battalion Marine Corps Installations Pacific-Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, executes a gutter-up during a water survival advanced (WSA) course Jan. 29, 2020, at Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. WSA is the highest swim qualification Marines and sailors can receive before attending the instructor’s course. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennan J. Beauton)

U.S. Marines and sailors hold their rifles above water during a water survival advanced (WSA) course Jan. 29, 2020, at Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. WSA is the highest swim qualification Marines and sailors can receive before attending the instructor’s course. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennan J. Beauton)

From left, U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Trevor Evan, a maintenance operations chief with Headquarters and Support Battalion Marine Corps Installations Pacific-Marine Corps Base Camp Butler (H&S BN, MCIPAC-MCBB), Cpl. Brennan Priest, a combat videographer with H&S BN, MCIPAC-MCBB, and Lance Cpl. Zachary Larsen, a combat graphic specialist with H&S BN, MCIPAC-MCBB, execute gutter-ups during a water survival advanced (WSA) course Jan. 27, 2020, at Fairchild Pool on Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. WSA is the highest swim qualification Marines and sailors can receive before attending the instructor’s course. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennan J. Beauton)

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