FARP Northern Viper 2020

U.S. Marines from Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Air Control Group 36, 1st Marine Air Wing, guides an UH-1Y helicopter attached to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369 after being successfully refueled on a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)
U.S. Marines from Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Air Control Group 36, 1st Marine Air Wing, guides an UH-1Y helicopter attached to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369 after being successfully refueled on a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marines from Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Air Control Group 36, 1st Marine Air Wing, guides an UH-1Y helicopter attached to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369 after being successfully refueled on a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marines from Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Air Control Group 36, 1st Marine Air Wing, observe an AH-1Z Viper attack helicopter and an UH-1Y helicopter attached to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369 leave the Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) after being successfully refueled during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)
U.S. Marines from Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Air Control Group 36, 1st Marine Air Wing, observe an AH-1Z Viper attack helicopter and an UH-1Y helicopter attached to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369 leave the Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) after being successfully refueled during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marines from Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Air Control Group 36, 1st Marine Air Wing, refuel an AH-1Z Viper attack helicopter attached to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369 on a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marines from Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Air Control Group 36, 1st Marine Air Wing, refuel an AH-1Z Viper attack helicopter attached to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369 on a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marines from Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Air Control Group 36, 1st Marine Air Wing, refuel an UH-1Y helicopter attached to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369 on a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marines from Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Air Control Group 36, 1st Marine Air Wing, refuel an UH-1Y helicopter attached to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369 on a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marines from Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Air Control Group 36, 1st Marine Air Wing, refuel an AH-1Z Viper attack helicopter attached to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369 on a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marines from Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Air Control Group 36, 1st Marine Air Wing, refuel an UH-1Y helicopter attached to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369 on a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marines from Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Air Control Group 36, 1st Marine Air Wing, prepare to refuel an AH-1Z Viper attack helicopter attached to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369 on a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marines from Marine Air Control Squadron 4, Marine Air Control Group 18, 1st Marine Air Wing, operate in a Remote Landing Site Tower while maintaining a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capabilities to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Nicholas Anderson, an air traffic controller from Marine Air Control Squadron 4 (MACS-4), Marine Air Control Group 18 (MACG-18), 1st Marine Air Wing, gives a class on the Defense Advanced GPS Receiver on a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marines from Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Air Control Group 36, 1st Marine Air Wing, guides an UH-1Y helicopter attached to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369 after being successfully refueled on a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marines from Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Air Control Group 36, 1st Marine Air Wing, prepare to refuel an UH-1Y helicopter attached to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369 on a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marines from Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Air Control Group 36, 1st Marine Air Wing, prepare to refuel an UH-1Y helicopterattached to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369 on a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marines from Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Air Control Group 36, 1st Marine Air Wing, prepare to refuel an AH-1Z Viper attack helicopter attached to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369 on a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marines from Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Air Control Group 36, 1st Marine Air Wing, prepare a landing zone to be a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marines from Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Air Control Group 36, 1st Marine Air Wing, prepare a landing zone to be a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marines from Marine Air Control Squadron 4, Marine Air Control Group 18, 1st Marine Air Wing, monitor the Remote Landing Site Tower while maintaining a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capabilities to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marines from Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Air Control Group 36, 1st Marine Air Wing, prepare a landing zone to be a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Eric Montestorres, an air traffic control navigation aid technician from Marine Air Control Squadron 4, Marine Air Control Group 18, 1st Marine Air Wing, constructs a Tactical Air Navigation System while preparing a landing zone for a Forward Arming and Refueling Point (FARP) during exercise Northern Viper on Yausubetsu Training Area, Hokkaido, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. FARPs give Marines the capability to rapidly re-arm munitions and refuel aircraft while forward deployed. Northern Viper is a regularly scheduled training exercise that is designed to enhance the collective defense capabilities of the U.S. and Japan Alliance by allowing infantry units to maintain their lethality and proficiency in infantry and combined arms tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jackson Dukes)

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