Eyes on the Sky: U.S., Australia Collaborate to Advance Space Superiority

NAVAL COMMUNICATION STATION HAROLD E. HOLT, Australia – Royal Australian Air Force Flight Lt. James Pak, RAAF No. 1 Remote Sensor Unit, and U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Jennifer Beisel, space liaison officer , 21st Operations Group, 21st Space Wing, work together to monitor and operate a U.S.-owned C-Band space surveillance radar system at NCS Harold E. Holt, near Exmouth, Australia. Strategically located to cover both the southern and eastern hemisphere, the C-Band radar provides tracking and identification of space assets and debris for the U.S. space surveillance network. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeanette Mullinax)
NAVAL COMMUNICATION STATION HAROLD E. HOLT, Australia – Royal Australian Air Force Flight Lt. James Pak, RAAF No. 1 Remote Sensor Unit, and U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Jennifer Beisel, space liaison officer , 21st Operations Group, 21st Space Wing, work together to monitor and operate a U.S.-owned C-Band space surveillance radar system at NCS Harold E. Holt, near Exmouth, Australia. Strategically located to cover both the southern and eastern hemisphere, the C-Band radar provides tracking and identification of space assets and debris for the U.S. space surveillance network. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeanette Mullinax)

NAVAL COMMUNICATION STATION HAROLD E. HOLT, Australia – Royal Australian Air Force Flight Lt. James Pak, RAAF No. 1 Remote Sensor Unit, and U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Jennifer Beisel, space liaison officer , 21st Operations Group, 21st Space Wing, work together to monitor and operate a U.S.-owned C-Band space surveillance radar system at NCS Harold E. Holt, near Exmouth, Australia. Strategically located to cover both the southern and eastern hemisphere, the C-Band radar provides tracking and identification of space assets and debris for the U.S. space surveillance network. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeanette Mullinax)

NAVAL COMMUNICATION STATION HAROLD E. HOLT, Australia – The Space Surveillance Telescope (SST), developed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), is being reassembled at NCS Harold E. Holt, near Exmouth, Australia. The SST is a ground-based optical system that detects and tracks small objects in deep space, and provides an unprecedented wide-area search capability that will enhance space situational awareness of the Southern Celestial Hemisphere. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeanette Mullinax)
NAVAL COMMUNICATION STATION HAROLD E. HOLT, Australia – The Space Surveillance Telescope (SST), developed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), is being reassembled at NCS Harold E. Holt, near Exmouth, Australia. The SST is a ground-based optical system that detects and tracks small objects in deep space, and provides an unprecedented wide-area search capability that will enhance space situational awareness of the Southern Celestial Hemisphere. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeanette Mullinax)

NAVAL COMMUNICATION STATION HAROLD E. HOLT, Australia – The Space Surveillance Telescope (SST), developed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), is being reassembled at NCS Harold E. Holt, near Exmouth, Australia. The SST is a ground-based optical system that detects and tracks small objects in deep space, and provides an unprecedented wide-area search capability that will enhance space situational awareness of the Southern Celestial Hemisphere. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeanette Mullinax)

NAVAL COMMUNICATION STATION HAROLD E. HOLT, Australia – Royal Australian Air Force Flight Lt. James Pak, RAAF No. 1 Remote Sensor Unit, works with U.S. Air Force counterparts to monitor and operate a U.S.-owned C-Band space surveillance radar system at NCS Harold E. Holt, near Exmouth, Australia. Strategically located to cover both the southern and eastern hemisphere, the C-Band radar provides tracking and identification of space assets and debris for the U.S. space surveillance network. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeanette Mullinax)

NAVAL COMMUNICATION STATION HAROLD E. HOLT, Australia – U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Jennifer Beisel, space liaison officer, 21st Operations Group, 21st Space Wing, works alongside Royal Australian Air Force to monitor and operate a U.S.-owned C-Band space surveillance radar system at NCS Harold E. Holt, near Exmouth, Australia. Strategically located to cover both the southern and eastern hemisphere, the C-Band radar provides tracking and identification of space assets and debris for the U.S. space surveillance network. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeanette Mullinax)

NAVAL COMMUNICATION STATION HAROLD E. HOLT, Australia – Royal Australian Air Force Flight Lt. James Pak, RAAF No. 1 Remote Sensor Unit, and U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Jennifer Beisel, space liaison officer , 21st Operations Group, 21st Space Wing, work together to monitor and operate a U.S.-owned C-Band space surveillance radar system at NCS Harold E. Holt, near Exmouth, Australia. Strategically located to cover both the southern and eastern hemisphere, the C-Band radar provides tracking and identification of space assets and debris for the U.S. space surveillance network. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeanette Mullinax)

NAVAL COMMUNICATION STATION HAROLD E. HOLT, Australia – A C-Band space surveillance radar system, owned by the U.S. Air Force, operates as a dedicated sensor node at NCS Harold E. Holt, near Exmouth, Australia. Strategically located to cover both the southern and eastern hemisphere, the C-Band radar provides tracking and identification of space assets and debris for the U.S. space surveillance network. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeanette Mullinax)

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