Desert tortoise Sanctuary Hatching Success

Louise (left) and Thelma (right), sister ambassador tortoises, eat vegetables in their enclosure at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site on Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. These two tortoises were adopted in 2006 by retired Maj. Gen. Douglas M. Stone. Now they help educate children and other people about tortoises in Twentynine Palms. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)
Louise (left) and Thelma (right), sister ambassador tortoises, eat vegetables in their enclosure at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site on Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. These two tortoises were adopted in 2006 by retired Maj. Gen. Douglas M. Stone. Now they help educate children and other people about tortoises in Twentynine Palms. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)

Louise (left) and Thelma (right), sister ambassador tortoises, eat vegetables in their enclosure at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site on Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. These two tortoises were adopted in 2006 by retired Maj. Gen. Douglas M. Stone. Now they help educate children and other people about tortoises in Twentynine Palms. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)

A desert tortoise is inspected for growth at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site (TRACRS) on the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. TRACRS and Head Start Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, is a part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)
A desert tortoise is inspected for growth at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site (TRACRS) on the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. TRACRS and Head Start Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, is a part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)

The enclosures at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site (TRACRS), on the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California, minimizes predation of the young desert tortoises until they are old enough to be released to the wild. TRACRS and the Head Start Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, is a part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron Parks)
The enclosures at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site (TRACRS), on the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California, minimizes predation of the young desert tortoises until they are old enough to be released to the wild. TRACRS and the Head Start Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, is a part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron Parks)

A desert tortoise eats dandelion greens at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site (TRACRS) on Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. TRACRS and the Head Start Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, is a part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron Parks)
A desert tortoise eats dandelion greens at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site (TRACRS) on Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. TRACRS and the Head Start Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, is a part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron Parks)

A desert tortoise walks around inside its pen at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site (TRACRS) at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. TRACRS and Head Start Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, is a part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron Parks)
A desert tortoise walks around inside its pen at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site (TRACRS) at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. TRACRS and Head Start Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, is a part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron Parks)

A desert tortoise emerges from its burrow at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site (TRACRS) on the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. TRACRS and the Head Start Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, is a part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)
A desert tortoise emerges from its burrow at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site (TRACRS) on the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. TRACRS and the Head Start Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, is a part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)

Desert tortoises are hatched and raised at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. The Head Start facility (TRACRS) site and Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, is a part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)
Desert tortoises are hatched and raised at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. The Head Start facility (TRACRS) and Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, is a part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)

Desert tortoises are hatched and raised at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. The Headstart facility and Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, are a part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)
Desert tortoises are hatched and raised at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. The Headstart facility and Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, are a part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)

Desert tortoise hatchlings are tagged and raised at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. The Head Start facility (TRACRS) and Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, is a part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)
Desert tortoise hatchlings are tagged and raised at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. The Head Start facility (TRACRS) and Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, is a part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)

Thelma, a 23-year old ambassador tortoise, eats vegetables in her enclosure at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site on Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. Thelma and her sister Louise were adopted in 2006 by retired Maj. Gen. Douglas M. Stone. Now Thelma and Louise help educate children and other people about tortoises in Twentynine Palms. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)
Thelma, a 23-year old ambassador tortoise, eats vegetables in her enclosure at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site on Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. Thelma and her sister Louise were adopted in 2006 by retired Maj. Gen. Douglas M. Stone. Now Thelma and Louise help educate children and other people about tortoises in Twentynine Palms. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)

Louise (left) and Thelma (right), sister ambassador tortoises, eat vegetables in their enclosure at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site on Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. These two tortoises were adopted in 2006 by retired Maj. Gen. Douglas M. Stone. Now they help educate children and other people about tortoises in Twentynine Palms. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)
Louise (left) and Thelma (right), sister ambassador tortoises, eat vegetables in their enclosure at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site on Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. These two tortoises were adopted in 2006 by retired Maj. Gen. Douglas M. Stone. Now they help educate children and other people about tortoises in Twentynine Palms. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)

Desert tortoises are hatched and raised at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. The Head Start facility (TRACRS) site and Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, is a part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)
Desert tortoises are hatched and raised at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. The Head Start facility (TRACRS) site and Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, is a part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)

Dr. Brian Henen, Ecologist, of the Environmental Affairs Division inspects a desert tortoise at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site on the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. TRACRS and the Head Start Program, run by MCAGCC’s Environmental Affairs Division, epitomizes, the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)

Dr. Brian Henen, Ecologist, Environmental Affairs Division inspects the shell hardness of a desert tortoise at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site (TRACRS) on the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. TRACRS and the Head Start Program, run by Environmental Affairs is part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)
Dr. Brian Henen, Ecologist, Environmental Affairs Division inspects the shell hardness of a desert tortoise at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site (TRACRS) on the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. TRACRS and the Head Start Program, run by Environmental Affairs is part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)

Dr. Brian Henen, Ecologist, Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC) feeds a desert tortoise in its enclosure at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site (TRACRS) on MCAGCC, Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. TRACRS and the Head Start Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, is part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)
Dr. Brian Henen, Ecologist, Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC) feeds a desert tortoise in its enclosure at the Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site (TRACRS) on MCAGCC, Twentynine Palms, California, March 15, 2021. TRACRS and the Head Start Program, run by the MCAGCC Environmental Affairs Division, is part of the Marine Corps’ commitment to environmental stewardship.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Cameron E. Parks)

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