Davis-Monthan AFB A-10s practice at the Barry M. Goldwater Range

An A-10 Thunderbolt II, assigned to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., flies over the Barry M. Goldwater Range, Feb. 11, 2020, near Gila Bend, Ariz. The A-10, nicknamed the Warthog, is primarily a low-altitude, close air support platform that can employ a wide variety of conventional munitions. The range supports approximately 24 Air Force squadrons, other branches of the military, reserve units and local agencies who use it to train on a variety of missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jacob Wongwai)
An A-10 Thunderbolt II, assigned to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., flies over the Barry M. Goldwater Range, Feb. 11, 2020, near Gila Bend, Ariz. The A-10, nicknamed the Warthog, is primarily a low-altitude, close air support platform that can employ a wide variety of conventional munitions. The range supports approximately 24 Air Force squadrons, other branches of the military, reserve units and local agencies who use it to train on a variety of missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jacob Wongwai)

An A-10 Thunderbolt II, assigned to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., flies over the Barry M. Goldwater Range, Feb. 11, 2020, near Gila Bend, Ariz. The A-10, nicknamed the Warthog, is primarily a low-altitude, close air support platform that can employ a wide variety of conventional munitions. The range supports approximately 24 Air Force squadrons, other branches of the military, reserve units and local agencies who use it to train on a variety of missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jacob Wongwai)

An A-10 Thunderbolt II, assigned to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., flies over the Barry M. Goldwater Range, Feb. 11, 2020, near Gila Bend, Ariz. The A-10, nicknamed the Warthog, is primarily a low-altitude, close air support platform that can employ a wide variety of conventional munitions. The range supports approximately 24 Air Force squadrons, other branches of the military, reserve units and local agencies who use it to train on a variety of missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jacob Wongwai)
An A-10 Thunderbolt II, assigned to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., flies over the Barry M. Goldwater Range, Feb. 11, 2020, near Gila Bend, Ariz. The A-10, nicknamed the Warthog, is primarily a low-altitude, close air support platform that can employ a wide variety of conventional munitions. The range supports approximately 24 Air Force squadrons, other branches of the military, reserve units and local agencies who use it to train on a variety of missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jacob Wongwai)

An A-10 Thunderbolt II, assigned to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., flies over the Barry M. Goldwater Range, Feb. 11, 2020, near Gila Bend, Ariz. The A-10 is a low-altitude, close air support platform with the GAU-8 Avenger 30mm Gatling gun, capable of firing 3,900 rounds per minute. The range supports approximately 24 Air Force squadrons, other branches of the military, reserve units and local agencies who use it to train on a variety of missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jacob Wongwai)

An A-10 Thunderbolt II, assigned to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., flies over the Barry M. Goldwater Range, Feb. 11, 2020, near Gila Bend, Ariz. The A-10’s main weapon is the GAU-8 Avenger 30mm Gatlin gun, and the aircraft can also carry an additional 16,000 pounds of munitions under the wings and belly of the aircraft. The range supports approximately 24 Air Force squadrons, other branches of the military, reserve units and local agencies who use it to train on a variety of missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jacob Wongwai)

An A-10 Thunderbolt II, assigned to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz. flies over the Barry M. Goldwater Range, Feb. 11, 2020, near Gila Bend, Ariz. The A-10 features a GAU-8 Avenger 30mm Gatlin gun, and the aircraft can employ up to 16,000 pounds of munitions mounted on its wings and fuselage. The range supports approximately 24 Air Force squadrons, other branches of the military, reserve units and local agencies who use it to train on a variety of missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jacob Wongwai)

An A-10 Thunderbolt II, assigned to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., strafes a target at the Barry M. Goldwater Range, Feb. 11, 2020, near Gila Bend, Ariz. The A-10’s 30mm GAU-8 Gatling gun is capable of firing 3,900 rounds per minute to engage a wide variety of enemy targets. The range supports approximately 24 Air Force squadrons, other branches of the military, reserve units and local agencies who use it to train on a variety of missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jacob Wongwai)

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