Bolt Aircraft Maintenance Unit – Bring the Future Faster

Senior Airman Aaron Hooks, an F-35A Lightning II dedicated crew chief assigned to the 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Bolt Aircraft Maintenance Unit, signals a pilot at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Dec. 17, 2019. Their job is to see that aircraft are operationally ready by performing scheduled inspections, functional checks and preventive maintenance both before and after flights, and ensuring that the aircraft has been properly serviced with fuel, hydraulic fluid and liquid oxygen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan Guthrie)
Senior Airman Aaron Hooks, an F-35A Lightning II dedicated crew chief assigned to the 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Bolt Aircraft Maintenance Unit, signals a pilot at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Dec. 17, 2019. Their job is to see that aircraft are operationally ready by performing scheduled inspections, functional checks and preventive maintenance both before and after flights, and ensuring that the aircraft has been properly serviced with fuel, hydraulic fluid and liquid oxygen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan Guthrie)

Senior Airman Aaron Hooks, an F-35A Lightning II dedicated crew chief assigned to the 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron (AMXS) Bolt Aircraft Maintenance Unit, cleans the canopy of an F-35A at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Dec. 17, 2019. The 57th AMXS accomplishes on-equipment maintenance of assigned aircraft, to include aircraft servicing, before and after flight inspections, launch and recovery, munitions loading and accomplishment of scheduled/unscheduled maintenance requirements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan Guthrie)
Senior Airman Aaron Hooks, an F-35A Lightning II dedicated crew chief assigned to the 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron (AMXS) Bolt Aircraft Maintenance Unit, cleans the canopy of an F-35A at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Dec. 17, 2019. The 57th AMXS accomplishes on-equipment maintenance of assigned aircraft, to include aircraft servicing, before and after flight inspections, launch and recovery, munitions loading and accomplishment of scheduled/unscheduled maintenance requirements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan Guthrie)

Senior Airman Aaron Hooks, an F-35A Lightning II dedicated crew chief assigned to the 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Bolt Aircraft Maintenance Unit, speaks to a pilot over his headset at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Dec. 17, 2019. Hooks was selected to test the Mad Hatter program which combines multiple programs that the maintenance teams use in their everyday work life. (U.S. Air Force photo by Bryan Guthrie)

Senior Airman Aaron Hooks, an F-35A Lightning II dedicated crew chief assigned to the 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Bolt Aircraft Maintenance Unit, signals a pilot at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Dec. 17, 2019. Their job is to see that aircraft are operationally ready by performing scheduled inspections, functional checks and preventive maintenance both before and after flights, and ensuring that the aircraft has been properly serviced with fuel, hydraulic fluid and liquid oxygen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan Guthrie)

Senior Airman Aaron Hooks, an F-35A Lightning II dedicated crew chief assigned to the 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Bolt Aircraft Maintenance Unit Aircraft Maintenance Unit (AMU), uses a tablet to check technical orders at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Dec. 17, 2019. Bolt AMU has moved technical orders for the F-35 to tablets for convenience and flexibility. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan Guthrie)

An Airman assigned to the 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron uses a tablet to check technical orders at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Dec. 17. 2019. The tablets will eventually provide technical orders, personnel trackers, work orders and more from one platform. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan Guthrie)

Airmen assigned to the 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Bolt Aircraft Maintenance Unit huddle around a tablet at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Dec. 17, 2019. Technical manuals provide clear and concise instructions for the safe and effective operation and maintenance of U.S. Air Force military systems. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan Guthrie)

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